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When Politics Are Ruled by Sloth – Sensical Politics

When Politics Are Ruled by Sloth

If you pay any attention to the news, you would see myriad pundits and talk show hosts lamenting the debasement of politics. “No one listens anymore.” “Can’t we all just get along?” “The country is more divided than ever.” These phrases are repeated ad nauseam by some of the main progenitors of the souring of American political rhetoric. Now, you might be wondering, “Why can’t these supposedly intelligent people see the damage they are doing?” Some reasons may include the money, fame, and status that accompany their professions; however, I propose that their unhelpful tendencies can be explained by one trait: laziness.

I know I am not the only one whose emotional state shifted freely between genuine confusion and comical awe as I watched Eminem’s junior high-esque rant from the BET awards. Such a tantrum is, as Ben Shapiro would say, “shocking, but not unexpected” from a someone of Eminem’s ilk. We have come to expect to be lectured at every awards show, in each advertisement, and over every form of social media. This disdainful anxiety has pushed many to become cultural hermits or, even worse, devout partisans. While one should note that this is not entirely the fault of those who cheaply merchandise their political ideas from their lofty platforms – our sensitivities are also to blame – the blue noise emanating from Hollywood, New York, and Washington D.C. is inordinate, petty, and resultingly indolent.

Not only is the current politics/culture mix maddeningly inappropriate, it is also homogeneous. The conservative in me can not help but cringe at the predictable leftness of nearly all my favorite musicians. My favorite artist, Dustin Kensrue, is one of the most articulate songwriters I have ever heard. His songs about love capture its identity most fully and he never inoculates himself to self-criticism. Nonetheless, I periodically see him buy into a trendy political narrative and disregard the nuance that usually sets him apart. Earlier this year, his band, Thrice, released “Sea Change,” a climate change manifesto of sorts that reflects from an apocalyptic future where the earth is ruined as a result of humankind’s carelessness. Though it retains the melodic grace of his making, the lyrics could be sung by any pop star and fail to sound out of place. This is troubling. If even the deep thinkers of an artistic generation have a tendency to idly latch onto attractive talking points, then it is unlikely that the – to paraphrase the more fashionable Cyrus – ‘Fever in the U.S.A’ will subside any time soon.

Isolation, the “nasty woman” of politics, is another symptom of political sloth. Although isolation and homogeneity seem country cousins at the least, it is because they are. They feed off each other and exacerbate damage. They are also significant enough to separate. Both must be choked out to defeat feckless discourse. A good example of isolation is the overwhelming tendency of Twitter pundits to exclusively retweet opinions that do not contradict their own and avoid following anyone who may so much as utter a word of humble correction. Many go as far as to block the vicious dissidents who would dare oppose them. This is ‘peak depravity’ (the reformed church will understand). As gross as it is when progressives engage in this, it is especially hypocritical for snowflake-melting conservatives to do so. Habits such as these should be avoided at all costs for there to be any hope of healing in American society.

If you, young conservative, have read this and applied every negative trait to only the left, please re-read the article. BOTH SIDES are guilty of each of these shortcomings and only by a mutual desire to improve will real change occur, so take a look at your Twitter account. Peruse your Facebook page that has not been updated for eight months. Think about your friends. Listen to Mahatma Gandhi:

‘Be the change that you wish to see in the world.’

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If you pay any attention to the news, you would see myriad pundits and talk show hosts lamenting the debasement of politics. “No one listens anymore.” “Can’t we all just get along?” “The country is more divided than ever.” These phrases are repeated ad nauseam by some of the main progenitors of the souring of American political rhetoric. Now, you might be wondering, “Why can’t these supposedly intelligent people see the damage they are doing?” Some reasons may include the money, fame, and status that accompany their professions; however, I propose that their unhelpful tendencies can be explained by one trait: laziness.

I know I am not the only one whose emotional state shifted freely between genuine confusion and comical awe as I watched Eminem’s junior high-esque rant from the BET awards. Such a tantrum is, as Ben Shapiro would say, “shocking, but not unexpected” from a someone of Eminem’s ilk. We have come to expect to be lectured at every awards show, in each advertisement, and over every form of social media. This disdainful anxiety has pushed many to become cultural hermits or, even worse, devout partisans. While one should note that this is not entirely the fault of those who cheaply merchandise their political ideas from their lofty platforms – our sensitivities are also to blame – the blue noise emanating from Hollywood, New York, and Washington D.C. is inordinate, petty, and resultingly indolent.

Not only is the current politics/culture mix maddeningly inappropriate, it is also homogeneous. The conservative in me can not help but cringe at the predictable leftness of nearly all my favorite musicians. My favorite artist, Dustin Kensrue, is one of the most articulate songwriters I have ever heard. His songs about love capture its identity most fully and he never inoculates himself to self-criticism. Nonetheless, I periodically see him buy into a trendy political narrative and disregard the nuance that usually sets him apart. Earlier this year, his band, Thrice, released “Sea Change,” a climate change manifesto of sorts that reflects from an apocalyptic future where the earth is ruined as a result of humankind’s carelessness. Though it retains the melodic grace of his making, the lyrics could be sung by any pop star and fail to sound out of place. This is troubling. If even the deep thinkers of an artistic generation have a tendency to idly latch onto attractive talking points, then it is unlikely that the – to paraphrase the more fashionable Cyrus – ‘Fever in the U.S.A’ will subside any time soon.

Isolation, the “nasty woman” of politics, is another symptom of political sloth. Although isolation and homogeneity seem country cousins at the least, it is because they are. They feed off each other and exacerbate damage. They are also significant enough to separate. Both must be choked out to defeat feckless discourse. A good example of isolation is the overwhelming tendency of Twitter pundits to exclusively retweet opinions that do not contradict their own and avoid following anyone who may so much as utter a word of humble correction. Many go as far as to block the vicious dissidents who would dare oppose them. This is ‘peak depravity’ (the reformed church will understand). As gross as it is when progressives engage in this, it is especially hypocritical for snowflake-melting conservatives to do so. Habits such as these should be avoided at all costs for there to be any hope of healing in American society.

If you, young conservative, have read this and applied every negative trait to only the left, please re-read the article. BOTH SIDES are guilty of each of these shortcomings and only by a mutual desire to improve will real change occur, so take a look at your Twitter account. Peruse your Facebook page that has not been updated for eight months. Think about your friends. Listen to Mahatma Gandhi:

‘Be the change that you wish to see in the world.’